Vertical Farming vs Vegans

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Vertical Farming

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Vertical Farming vs Vegans: Vegans who are hell-bent on saving the planet may be at risk from vertical farming foods. There’s no denying that when it comes to healthy nutrition, the majority of people today are highly confused and uneducated. And, judging by the enormous array of bizarre food and diet fads available, it’s evident that very few individuals truly grasp what is truly healthy. Obesity rates and data on chronic diseases portray a dismal story.

“Vertical-Farming Foods Could Pose Serious Health Risk To Vegans “

Veganism is good for the environment

One of the primary motivations for some people to switch to a vegan diet is to lessen their influence on a planet that is allegedly stressed out in part due to meat-producing agriculture. The vegan movement’s environmental and food zealotry creates a significant health danger to vegans who do not practice it effectively, particularly children and pregnant women. The risk of vitamin inadequacy is far too high, therefore it’s no surprise that most doctors advise against following a vegan diet.

Indoor farming that saves the environment vertically

Urban, vertical farming utilizing so-called hydroponic technologies, in which soil and real sunlight are not even used, is the latest planet-saving idea that has been gaining traction. It’s done inside, usually, in enormous, aban To stay healthy, the human body needs dozens of important minerals, trace elements, vitamins, fatty acids, and amino acids. Many of these nutrients come from Mother Nature’s fertile soil. The challenge is whether vertical, soil-free farms can produce foods that are as good as those grown outdoors in actual soil in a real garden and abandoned industrial buildings.
Vertical farms claim a number of benefits with their technology, including no pesticides or herbicides, a closely monitored and managed round-the-clock growing process, a 95 percent reduction in water use, clean product, and short farm-to-dinner table durations.
More importantly, it claims a far lower environmental and climate effect, and many vertical farms are funded by large investors. Naturally, all of these great selling features will certainly attract a slew of eco-conscious vegans to this new source of leafy greens and veggies.
However, if we take a step back and examine these vertical farms more closely, we can see that they are far from natural. They are mass-produced foods that are industrialized and have little to do with nature. They don’t need soil, are automated, work with artificial light, and aren’t exposed to the outdoors. The main goal is to produce as much plant mass as possible in the shortest amount of time. A side concern is nutrient density.

Nutrient density is low

Despite the fact that these vertical farms are very productive in terms of plant mass (which is how food is marketed, not nutrient content), the question remains as to how nutrient-dense these planet-saving industrially farmed crops are. It’s one thing to buy mass in a market, but it’s quite another to buy nutrients. After all, what good is a pound of kale if the plant has been doped to generate a lot of empty cellulose?

To stay healthy, the human body need dozens of important minerals, trace elements, vitamins, fatty acids, and amino acids. Many of these nutrients come from Mother Nature’s fertile soil. The challenge is whether vertical, soil-free farms can produce foods that are as good as those grown outdoors in actual soil in a real garden.Can a hydroponic solution made in a lab replace natural soil?

Vegans may be putting their health at danger

A number of specialists are suspicious, warning that these genetically modified crops could be deficient in a variety of vital elements. Opting for the vertically-farmed crop variety could entail substantial and genuine health hazards for vegans who are already eating a diet that borders on starvation.

So, what could go wrong for the already half-starved, climate-concerned vegans who flock to this new utopian source of leafy greens? There’s a good chance they’ll exacerbate their nutrient deficiency and become ill rapidly as a result. Another example of good intentions that may end in calamity.

Obsessions with cleanliness

Another danger could be linked to what appears to be an increasing concern with food hygiene and purity. We may be doing more harm than good to the human species in the long run, as the human immune system and natural detoxification and cleansing mechanisms may become lethargic and slow over time. Our bodies are capable of dealing with pollutants. There’s a reason we have kidneys, livers, and other organs. The danger is that if you don’t use it, it will be lost.

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